Organized by Estudio Pedro Reyes
in collaboration with




A collective poster project where every participating artist nominates two more artists, as an allegory of a creative chain reaction. The project is a collection of urgent messages calling for universal nuclear disarmament.

In 2023, the nine global nuclear powers, The United States, China, Russia, France, UK, Israel, North Korea, India and Pakistan are expanding their nuclear arsenals. We are entering a silent new arms race in which trillions of dollars are being spent. At this exact moment, there are open threats of thermonuclear war, as well as nuclear tests being carried out. The world is dangerously close to a nuclear disaster.

In opposition to this trend, the ICAN established a landmark global agreement to ban nuclear weapons, known officially as the Treaty to Prohibit Nuclear Weapons in 2017. It entered into force in January 2021 and has been signed by an overwhelming majority of the world’s nations.

Nuclear weapons have always been immoral; they are now illegal in the 92 signatory countries.

We know the countries that have yet to sign the nuclear ban treaty — the ones with the power to kill us all — will be the last to join. In nations hijacked by their military-industrial complexes, we can’t expect change to come from the top. Unless we exert public pressure worldwide, we are likely to experience nuclear war in our lifetime.

The good news is: we have done this in the past. Art and activism pressured governments in the 60s, 70s and 80s to dramatically reduce nuclear arsenals. An example of this was the 1 million protestors that gathered in Central Park in 1982, at the peak of the anti-nuclear movement. In 2020 there were approximately 13,400 nuclear weapons worldwide, compared with 63,632 in 1985, the highpoint for the global nuclear weapon stockpile.

Artists Against The Bomb was first publicly introduced in Vienna at the MST1, the first Meeting of States Parties to the UN Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons and the closing project will be presented in November of 2023 at the Second Meeting of State Parties MST2 at the United Nations in New York City.

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Organized by Estudio Pedro Reyes
in collaboration with ICAN






ARTISTS AGAINST THE BOMB is a collection of urgent messages calling for universal nuclear disarmament. This series of posters designed by international artists can be printed locally and exhibited anywhere in the world. Participating artists grant permission for these images to be used to spread awareness about the imminent threat of nuclear war and the urgent need to abolish all nuclear weapons. If the download button is available, you can do so and print these artworks anywhere you choose to add to the global call for nuclear disarmament.

In 2023, the nine global nuclear powers – the United States, China, Russia, France, UK, Israel, North Korea, India and Pakistan – are expanding their nuclear arsenals. We are entering a silent new arms race on which trillions of dollars are being spent. At this exact moment, there are open threats of thermonuclear war, as well as nuclear tests being carried out. The world is dangerously close to a nuclear disaster.

In 2017 ICAN (International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons), winners of the 2017 Peace Nobel Prize, established a landmark global agreement to ban nuclear weapons, known officially as the Treaty to Prohibit Nuclear Weapons. It entered into force in January 2021 and has been signed by an overwhelming majority of the world’s nations.

Nuclear weapons have always been immoral; they are now illegal.

We know the countries that have yet to sign the nuclear ban treaty — the ones with the power to kill us all — will not be the first to join. In nations hijacked by their military-industrial complexes, we can’t expect change to come from the top. Unless we exert public pressure worldwide, we are likely to experience nuclear war in our lifetime.

The good news is we have done this in the past. Art and activism have pressured governments to dramatically reduce nuclear arsenals. An example of this was the 1 million protestors that gathered in Central Park in 1982, at the peak of the anti-nuclear movement. In 2020 there were approximately 13,400 nuclear weapons worldwide, compared with 63,632 in 1985, the high point for the global nuclear weapon stockpile.

ARTISTS AGAINST THE BOMB invites artists from all over the world to participate, and each participating artist then nominates two other artists to take part in hopes of sparking a chain reaction. Part of the inspiration for this project comes from Gerald Holtom, the designer of the original logo for the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament. He chose not to trademark his creation so that it could be freely shared in support of the campaign, and that logo is now what we know as the Peace Sign.  

The poster series was first publicly introduced in Vienna at the MST1, first Meeting of States Parties to the TPNW. Afterward, it was presented at the Køs Museum in Copenhagen, on billboards across the city of Santa Fe, New Mexico, at Festival Ceremonia in Mexico City, and a growing number of other venues. The closing project will be presented in November of 2023 at the MST2, at the Visitor Lobby inside the United Nations in New York City, and at a parallel exhibition at the Judd Foudantion to expand the project’s exposure. 



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PEDRO
REYES







Pax Atomica is a fullscale rendering of the Hiroshima bomb also known as Little Boy, transformed into a bird cage where a dove, symbolizing peace, is trapped. The title may conjure terms such as Pax Romana, Pax Britannica or Pax Americana, all used to describe long periods of apparent peace that, if reviewed closely, were only possible under ruthless imperialist domination. With this work Reyes hopes to challenge the common assumption that ‘there have not been world wars since nuclear bombs were first used.’ To the contrary: there have been and continue to be countless wars, precisely because of the arrogance that characterizes nuclear armed states.

Pedro Reyes’ work follows a double path, addressing art as both aesthetic research and social practice. The first is developed through sculpture, the second through conceptual and participatory strategies. In 2008, Reyes initiated the ongoing Palas por pistolas project, in which 1,527 guns were melted unto shovels to plant 1,527 trees. This led to Disarm (2012) and the transformation of 6,700 destroyed guns into musical instruments. Reyes has held visiting faculty positions at Bard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 2022, Reyes held three survey shows: Escultura social at the MARCO Museum in Monterrey, Sociatry at the Marta Herford Museum in Germany and Direct Action at SITE Santa Fe, New Mexico.